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Kitsap County celebrates 150 years of rich history

A diverse group of Suquamish Tribe members performed a traditional song at last week’s commemoration of Kitsap County’s 150th Anniversary.   - Photo by Charlie Bermant
A diverse group of Suquamish Tribe members performed a traditional song at last week’s commemoration of Kitsap County’s 150th Anniversary.
— image credit: Photo by Charlie Bermant

The 60th Kitsap County Fair & Stampede shared its commemoration last week with the 150th birthday of the county.

“We have a proud history in Kitsap County,” said former North Kitsap Commissioner Chris Endresen, who appeared at the commemoration as U.S. Rep. Sen. Maria Cantwell. “With the leadership we have today and the leadership we have in the future, Kitsap County will continue to be a very special place.”

Also participating in the ceremony were current North Kitsap Commissioner Steve Bauer and South Kitsap Commissioner Jan Angel. Central Kitsap Commissioner Josh Brown was out of town.

Parks and Recreation Director Chip Faver opened the ceremony by calling the event “a great party,” and reported how Bob Carlson, a member of the Washington State Fair Commission, completed an assessment of the Fair on Wednesday and gave it the highest marks.

“He told me that he had never seen fairgrounds so well maintained throughout his years on the Fair Commission,” Faver said.

Carlson presented the fair with a special award of recognition, which Faver said will be permanently displayed in the pavilion lobby.

“These awards are completely discretionary,” Faver said. “You only get one if they think you deserve it.”

Angel provided some county history, noting how the county was originally named for a soldier named Slaughter but that name was rejected by the public who chose to honor Kitsap, a Native American, instead.

This connection also was mentioned by Suquamish Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman.

“We recognize the importance of this partnership,” Forsman said. “We have had our differences in the past, but we always manage to work together.” 

The ceremony ended with a traditional Suquamish song, performed by a combination of tribal elders and youngsters.

“The Fair is Kitsap County’s biggest barbecue,” Faver said. “Everyone who has come has had a great time.”

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