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Mock crash sobers students

Central Kitsap Fire & Rescue volunteers and a staff member from the county Coroner’s Office load Tyler McFarland into a body bag during Wednesday’s mock crash demonstration at CK High School.  - Photo by Jesse Beals
Central Kitsap Fire & Rescue volunteers and a staff member from the county Coroner’s Office load Tyler McFarland into a body bag during Wednesday’s mock crash demonstration at CK High School.
— image credit: Photo by Jesse Beals

Central Kitsap Fire & Rescue was on the scene. So were Sheriff’s deputies and State Patrol troopers.

But this was no ordinary drunk driving car crash.

At a quarter to 10 a.m., the bloodied victims were attempting to crawl into the smashed white vehicles. The rescue team was helping them sprawl out amongst the deformed steel frame of the Volkswagen, T-boned by a Toyota Camry. The scene was covered with blue tarp.

It was the fourth annual mock crash at Central Kitsap High School.

Seven student actors, all seniors dressed in formal prom gowns and tuxes, took on the roles of both drivers and the passengers. The purpose of the Tuesday morning event, organized by CKHS parents and staff and the county chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, was to remind the Class of 2006 about the dangers of drunk driving.

The mock crash was timed for the eve of CKHS’ prom this weekend at the Convention Center in Bremerton.

Marsha Masters, president of MADD’s Kitsap chapter, dedicated the mock crash to CKHS 2003 graduate Heather Meadows, who was killed when a drunk driver hit her car a little more than a year ago.

During her senior year, Meadows applied the make-up to classmates who acted in the first mock crash at CKHS.

The mock crash CKHS seniors witnessed this week is part of a series MADD helps put on in area schools and the rescue teams, law enforcement and Airlift Northwest come out full-force for each one.

“Believe me they’d rather come out here, do this show and practice this hundreds and hundreds of times than go out there and deal with the real thing,” Masters told the school’s seniors.

Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Martin, narrator for the mock crash, concurred.

“Most people who drink and drive, their main thought process is, ‘Gee, I could get arrested,’” Martin said. “They don’t think about causing something like this and it weighs on their conscience for the rest of their life,” he added, gesturing toward the collided vehicles at the periphery of the school’s stadium.

Party music sounded from the speakers

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