Most people recognize the dark significance behind a swastika, the auspicious Hindu symbol facing the wrong way. But less well-known is the significance behind the 14 words, 88, Hammerskins and the World Church of the Creator.Kitsap Human Rights Network member José Chevere spent nearly a year cataloging the symbols and groups associated with Northwest white power and bound them in a resource that will be distributed to school districts, city and county administrators and law enforcement personnel.In preliminary presentations, school district administrators have expressed enthusiasm for the report, which has page-by-page pictures of logos, slogans and symbols from t-shirts, stickers and Web sites, with descriptions beneath explaining what the group is or what the words mean.The hate symbol catalog is intended to provide administrators unfamiliar with white power symbolism with a tool for identifying hateful attitudes in schools or on the streets.We hope it's going to be a tool to help stop hate and bias crime in the community, said Kitsap Human Rights Network chairman Jerry Hebert.So far, the preliminary viewings of the as-yet unfinished document have proven successful.Chevere said he first began to see the catalog's potential the day he saw a young woman walking around in a Hammergirls - a white power group - t-shirt. He mentioned it to a friend of his, an administrator at a South Kitsap high school. That led into a discussion that he didn't know what to look for, Chevere said.He brought a copy of the catalog to his friend to show him.That day, there was a little incident in the commons of the school, and one of the boys involved was brought to the associate principal's office. On his folder, he had written the word Rahowa, among other white power references. Rahowa is an acronym for racial holy war.The boy initially had lied to the associate principal about what the symbols meant but, armed with the catalog, she confronted him and he told the truth.It was a total coincidence that it happened that day, Chevere said.He said administrators who have seen the catalog are interested in getting their own copies and having it distributed.Chevere said the catalog probably will be updated, but added most of the new symbols incorporate elements of the old ones.The symbols in the catalog are not unusual around the county. One of the things that I found a little scary is, in my own experience, I've seen several of these symbols several times in Kitsap County, Chevere said.He took the catalog to a high school art teacher after seeing a young man walking around with a Hammerskins flag he made in art class. The teacher didn't pick up on the youth's project because she didn't know what the symbol meant.How many people are seeing this and not knowing what the symbols mean? Chevere said. That's why I think the catalog will be a useful tool. " "/> Most people recognize the dark significance behind a swastika, the auspicious Hindu symbol facing the wrong way. But less well-known is the significance behind the 14 words, 88, Hammerskins and the World Church of the Creator.Kitsap Human Rights Network member José Chevere spent nearly a year cataloging the symbols and groups associated with Northwest white power and bound them in a resource that will be distributed to school districts, city and county administrators and law enforcement personnel.In preliminary presentations, school district administrators have expressed enthusiasm for the report, which has page-by-page pictures of logos, slogans and symbols from t-shirts, stickers and Web sites, with descriptions beneath explaining what the group is or what the words mean.The hate symbol catalog is intended to provide administrators unfamiliar with white power symbolism with a tool for identifying hateful attitudes in schools or on the streets.We hope it's going to be a tool to help stop hate and bias crime in the community, said Kitsap Human Rights Network chairman Jerry Hebert.So far, the preliminary viewings of the as-yet unfinished document have proven successful.Chevere said he first began to see the catalog's potential the day he saw a young woman walking around in a Hammergirls - a white power group - t-shirt. He mentioned it to a friend of his, an administrator at a South Kitsap high school. That led into a discussion that he didn't know what to look for, Chevere said.He brought a copy of the catalog to his friend to show him.That day, there was a little incident in the commons of the school, and one of the boys involved was brought to the associate principal's office. On his folder, he had written the word Rahowa, among other white power references. Rahowa is an acronym for racial holy war.The boy initially had lied to the associate principal about what the symbols meant but, armed with the catalog, she confronted him and he told the truth.It was a total coincidence that it happened that day, Chevere said.He said administrators who have seen the catalog are interested in getting their own copies and having it distributed.Chevere said the catalog probably will be updated, but added most of the new symbols incorporate elements of the old ones.The symbols in the catalog are not unusual around the county. One of the things that I found a little scary is, in my own experience, I've seen several of these symbols several times in Kitsap County, Chevere said.He took the catalog to a high school art teacher after seeing a young man walking around with a Hammerskins flag he made in art class. The teacher didn't pick up on the youth's project because she didn't know what the symbol meant.How many people are seeing this and not knowing what the symbols mean? Chevere said. That's why I think the catalog will be a useful tool. "">Most people recognize the dark significance behind a swastika, the auspicious Hindu symbol facing the wrong way. But less well-known is the significance behind the 14 words, 88, Hammerskins and the World Church of the Creator.Kitsap Human Rights Network member José Chevere spent nearly a year cataloging the symbols and groups associated with Northwest white power and bound them in a resource that will be distributed to school districts, city and county administrators and law enforcement personnel.In preliminary presentations, school district administrators have expressed enthusiasm for the report, which has page-by-page pictures of logos, slogans and symbols from t-shirts, stickers and Web sites, with descriptions beneath explaining what the group is or what the words mean.The hate symbol catalog is intended to provide administrators unfamiliar with white power symbolism with a tool for identifying hateful attitudes in schools or on the streets.We hope it's going to be a tool to help stop hate and bias crime in the community, said Kitsap Human Rights Network chairman Jerry Hebert.So far, the preliminary viewings of the as-yet unfinished document have proven successful.Chevere said he first began to see the catalog's potential the day he saw a young woman walking around in a Hammergirls - a white power group - t-shirt. He mentioned it to a friend of his, an administrator at a South Kitsap high school. That led into a discussion that he didn't know what to look for, Chevere said.He brought a copy of the catalog to his friend to show him.That day, there was a little incident in the commons of the school, and one of the boys involved was brought to the associate principal's office. On his folder, he had written the word Rahowa, among other white power references. Rahowa is an acronym for racial holy war.The boy initially had lied to the associate principal about what the symbols meant but, armed with the catalog, she confronted him and he told the truth.It was a total coincidence that it happened that day, Chevere said.He said administrators who have seen the catalog are interested in getting their own copies and having it distributed.Chevere said the catalog probably will be updated, but added most of the new symbols incorporate elements of the old ones.The symbols in the catalog are not unusual around the county. One of the things that I found a little scary is, in my own experience, I've seen several of these symbols several times in Kitsap County, Chevere said.He took the catalog to a high school art teacher after seeing a young man walking around with a Hammerskins flag he made in art class. The teacher didn't pick up on the youth's project because she didn't know what the symbol meant.How many people are seeing this and not knowing what the symbols mean? Chevere said. That's why I think the catalog will be a useful tool. " "/> "Hate symbol catalog available to schools, police" - Central Kitsap Reporter
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"Hate symbol catalog available to schools, police"

">Most people recognize the dark significance behind a swastika, the auspicious Hindu symbol facing the wrong way. But less well-known is the significance behind the 14 words, 88, Hammerskins and the World Church of the Creator.Kitsap Human Rights Network member José Chevere spent nearly a year cataloging the symbols and groups associated with Northwest white power and bound them in a resource that will be distributed to school districts, city and county administrators and law enforcement personnel.In preliminary presentations, school district administrators have expressed enthusiasm for the report, which has page-by-page pictures of logos, slogans and symbols from t-shirts, stickers and Web sites, with descriptions beneath explaining what the group is or what the words mean.The hate symbol catalog is intended to provide administrators unfamiliar with white power symbolism with a tool for identifying hateful attitudes in schools or on the streets.We hope it's going to be a tool to help stop hate and bias crime in the community, said Kitsap Human Rights Network chairman Jerry Hebert.So far, the preliminary viewings of the as-yet unfinished document have proven successful.Chevere said he first began to see the catalog's potential the day he saw a young woman walking around in a Hammergirls - a white power group - t-shirt. He mentioned it to a friend of his, an administrator at a South Kitsap high school. That led into a discussion that he didn't know what to look for, Chevere said.He brought a copy of the catalog to his friend to show him.That day, there was a little incident in the commons of the school, and one of the boys involved was brought to the associate principal's office. On his folder, he had written the word Rahowa, among other white power references. Rahowa is an acronym for racial holy war.The boy initially had lied to the associate principal about what the symbols meant but, armed with the catalog, she confronted him and he told the truth.It was a total coincidence that it happened that day, Chevere said.He said administrators who have seen the catalog are interested in getting their own copies and having it distributed.Chevere said the catalog probably will be updated, but added most of the new symbols incorporate elements of the old ones.The symbols in the catalog are not unusual around the county. One of the things that I found a little scary is, in my own experience, I've seen several of these symbols several times in Kitsap County, Chevere said.He took the catalog to a high school art teacher after seeing a young man walking around with a Hammerskins flag he made in art class. The teacher didn't pick up on the youth's project because she didn't know what the symbol meant.How many people are seeing this and not knowing what the symbols mean? Chevere said. That's why I think the catalog will be a useful tool. "

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