Things have been a lot quieter at the Kitsap County Fairgrounds since sheriff's deputies arrested a suspect for the arson fire of the beer garden in late August.Damage to the building and contents was estimated at about $45,000, according to the Sheriff's report of the June 11 fire.The deputy investigating the incident cleared several unsolved incidents at the Fairgrounds over the past year after the arrest, said Lt. Don Lutes of the Sheriff's Department.Lutes added, Our number of calls have gone way down, down there, since Deputy Steve Argyle arrested a 14-year-old resident of Tibardis Road on suspicion of second-degree arson, and brought him to juvenile detention.Although a judge found probable cause to hold the suspect and set bail, he was later released pending further investigation, said county Deputy Prosecutor Greg Hubbard.Argyle's multi-page report tracks the suspect through interviews with several youths, all of whom have had brushes with the law over the past few years, Hubbard said.Several said they saw the boy playing with fire and starting fires at the Fairgrounds. Others said they heard him brag about starting the fire that gutted the beer garden. Argyle's report stated that even as he was arresting the boy, after reading him his rights, the boy called out to another walking by to say he was with him the night of the fire.But the second, unidentified boy refused, saying, 'No, I wasn't,' according to Argyle.While all the young people involved in the investigation, ranging in age from 12 to 15, are known mischief makers, Hubbard noted it's not because they're rotten kids.It's just because there's no adult supervision, he said.Lutes said the number of calls for vandalism at the Fairgrounds and surrounding area peaked after school was out in June.Lutes attributed it to bad decisions on the part of the youthful offenders.They don't think they'll get caught, it's a secretive thing, and it's an impulsive crime, he said. But when a culprit finally is held accountable, the cost can be steep, and in more than just jail time, he added.According to state law, the perpetrator is responsible for paying restitution, Lutes said.I know of a kid who stole a car and hid it in the brush. When he came back the next day he found it completely demolished, to the tune of about $17,000, Lutes said.There were three kids involved in the theft. The (car) owner's insurance sued the three kids jointly for the money, he said.Damage for the beer garden was estimated at $20,000 for the contents, and $25,000 for the structure, according to facility manager Tom Dudzic of the Kitsap Parks and Recreation Department.And the restitution judgement doesn't go away when the offender is no longer a juvenile, said Hubbard. The state will go after the offender, not the parents, for repayment of damages.Those kids who think it all goes away when they turn 18, that's incorrect, said Hubbard.The court could hold him/her responsible potentially until they're 38 - 10 years after they're 18, and another 10 years beyond that, he said.The statute allows us to send it to collections. A collection agency can garnish their wages, he added.Making restitution is one part of a sentence a convicted youthful offender could expect, he noted.Other requirements could include mandatory school attendance, restitution payments if the youth is employed, as much as 30 days in jail, community supervision (by a probation officer), and community service, Hubbard said. " "/> Things have been a lot quieter at the Kitsap County Fairgrounds since sheriff's deputies arrested a suspect for the arson fire of the beer garden in late August.Damage to the building and contents was estimated at about $45,000, according to the Sheriff's report of the June 11 fire.The deputy investigating the incident cleared several unsolved incidents at the Fairgrounds over the past year after the arrest, said Lt. Don Lutes of the Sheriff's Department.Lutes added, Our number of calls have gone way down, down there, since Deputy Steve Argyle arrested a 14-year-old resident of Tibardis Road on suspicion of second-degree arson, and brought him to juvenile detention.Although a judge found probable cause to hold the suspect and set bail, he was later released pending further investigation, said county Deputy Prosecutor Greg Hubbard.Argyle's multi-page report tracks the suspect through interviews with several youths, all of whom have had brushes with the law over the past few years, Hubbard said.Several said they saw the boy playing with fire and starting fires at the Fairgrounds. Others said they heard him brag about starting the fire that gutted the beer garden. Argyle's report stated that even as he was arresting the boy, after reading him his rights, the boy called out to another walking by to say he was with him the night of the fire.But the second, unidentified boy refused, saying, 'No, I wasn't,' according to Argyle.While all the young people involved in the investigation, ranging in age from 12 to 15, are known mischief makers, Hubbard noted it's not because they're rotten kids.It's just because there's no adult supervision, he said.Lutes said the number of calls for vandalism at the Fairgrounds and surrounding area peaked after school was out in June.Lutes attributed it to bad decisions on the part of the youthful offenders.They don't think they'll get caught, it's a secretive thing, and it's an impulsive crime, he said. But when a culprit finally is held accountable, the cost can be steep, and in more than just jail time, he added.According to state law, the perpetrator is responsible for paying restitution, Lutes said.I know of a kid who stole a car and hid it in the brush. When he came back the next day he found it completely demolished, to the tune of about $17,000, Lutes said.There were three kids involved in the theft. The (car) owner's insurance sued the three kids jointly for the money, he said.Damage for the beer garden was estimated at $20,000 for the contents, and $25,000 for the structure, according to facility manager Tom Dudzic of the Kitsap Parks and Recreation Department.And the restitution judgement doesn't go away when the offender is no longer a juvenile, said Hubbard. The state will go after the offender, not the parents, for repayment of damages.Those kids who think it all goes away when they turn 18, that's incorrect, said Hubbard.The court could hold him/her responsible potentially until they're 38 - 10 years after they're 18, and another 10 years beyond that, he said.The statute allows us to send it to collections. A collection agency can garnish their wages, he added.Making restitution is one part of a sentence a convicted youthful offender could expect, he noted.Other requirements could include mandatory school attendance, restitution payments if the youth is employed, as much as 30 days in jail, community supervision (by a probation officer), and community service, Hubbard said. "">Things have been a lot quieter at the Kitsap County Fairgrounds since sheriff's deputies arrested a suspect for the arson fire of the beer garden in late August.Damage to the building and contents was estimated at about $45,000, according to the Sheriff's report of the June 11 fire.The deputy investigating the incident cleared several unsolved incidents at the Fairgrounds over the past year after the arrest, said Lt. Don Lutes of the Sheriff's Department.Lutes added, Our number of calls have gone way down, down there, since Deputy Steve Argyle arrested a 14-year-old resident of Tibardis Road on suspicion of second-degree arson, and brought him to juvenile detention.Although a judge found probable cause to hold the suspect and set bail, he was later released pending further investigation, said county Deputy Prosecutor Greg Hubbard.Argyle's multi-page report tracks the suspect through interviews with several youths, all of whom have had brushes with the law over the past few years, Hubbard said.Several said they saw the boy playing with fire and starting fires at the Fairgrounds. Others said they heard him brag about starting the fire that gutted the beer garden. Argyle's report stated that even as he was arresting the boy, after reading him his rights, the boy called out to another walking by to say he was with him the night of the fire.But the second, unidentified boy refused, saying, 'No, I wasn't,' according to Argyle.While all the young people involved in the investigation, ranging in age from 12 to 15, are known mischief makers, Hubbard noted it's not because they're rotten kids.It's just because there's no adult supervision, he said.Lutes said the number of calls for vandalism at the Fairgrounds and surrounding area peaked after school was out in June.Lutes attributed it to bad decisions on the part of the youthful offenders.They don't think they'll get caught, it's a secretive thing, and it's an impulsive crime, he said. But when a culprit finally is held accountable, the cost can be steep, and in more than just jail time, he added.According to state law, the perpetrator is responsible for paying restitution, Lutes said.I know of a kid who stole a car and hid it in the brush. When he came back the next day he found it completely demolished, to the tune of about $17,000, Lutes said.There were three kids involved in the theft. The (car) owner's insurance sued the three kids jointly for the money, he said.Damage for the beer garden was estimated at $20,000 for the contents, and $25,000 for the structure, according to facility manager Tom Dudzic of the Kitsap Parks and Recreation Department.And the restitution judgement doesn't go away when the offender is no longer a juvenile, said Hubbard. The state will go after the offender, not the parents, for repayment of damages.Those kids who think it all goes away when they turn 18, that's incorrect, said Hubbard.The court could hold him/her responsible potentially until they're 38 - 10 years after they're 18, and another 10 years beyond that, he said.The statute allows us to send it to collections. A collection agency can garnish their wages, he added.Making restitution is one part of a sentence a convicted youthful offender could expect, he noted.Other requirements could include mandatory school attendance, restitution payments if the youth is employed, as much as 30 days in jail, community supervision (by a probation officer), and community service, Hubbard said. " "/> Deputies bust alleged Fairgrounds arsonist - Central Kitsap Reporter
News

Deputies bust alleged Fairgrounds arsonist

">Things have been a lot quieter at the Kitsap County Fairgrounds since sheriff's deputies arrested a suspect for the arson fire of the beer garden in late August.Damage to the building and contents was estimated at about $45,000, according to the Sheriff's report of the June 11 fire.The deputy investigating the incident cleared several unsolved incidents at the Fairgrounds over the past year after the arrest, said Lt. Don Lutes of the Sheriff's Department.Lutes added, Our number of calls have gone way down, down there, since Deputy Steve Argyle arrested a 14-year-old resident of Tibardis Road on suspicion of second-degree arson, and brought him to juvenile detention.Although a judge found probable cause to hold the suspect and set bail, he was later released pending further investigation, said county Deputy Prosecutor Greg Hubbard.Argyle's multi-page report tracks the suspect through interviews with several youths, all of whom have had brushes with the law over the past few years, Hubbard said.Several said they saw the boy playing with fire and starting fires at the Fairgrounds. Others said they heard him brag about starting the fire that gutted the beer garden. Argyle's report stated that even as he was arresting the boy, after reading him his rights, the boy called out to another walking by to say he was with him the night of the fire.But the second, unidentified boy refused, saying, 'No, I wasn't,' according to Argyle.While all the young people involved in the investigation, ranging in age from 12 to 15, are known mischief makers, Hubbard noted it's not because they're rotten kids.It's just because there's no adult supervision, he said.Lutes said the number of calls for vandalism at the Fairgrounds and surrounding area peaked after school was out in June.Lutes attributed it to bad decisions on the part of the youthful offenders.They don't think they'll get caught, it's a secretive thing, and it's an impulsive crime, he said. But when a culprit finally is held accountable, the cost can be steep, and in more than just jail time, he added.According to state law, the perpetrator is responsible for paying restitution, Lutes said.I know of a kid who stole a car and hid it in the brush. When he came back the next day he found it completely demolished, to the tune of about $17,000, Lutes said.There were three kids involved in the theft. The (car) owner's insurance sued the three kids jointly for the money, he said.Damage for the beer garden was estimated at $20,000 for the contents, and $25,000 for the structure, according to facility manager Tom Dudzic of the Kitsap Parks and Recreation Department.And the restitution judgement doesn't go away when the offender is no longer a juvenile, said Hubbard. The state will go after the offender, not the parents, for repayment of damages.Those kids who think it all goes away when they turn 18, that's incorrect, said Hubbard.The court could hold him/her responsible potentially until they're 38 - 10 years after they're 18, and another 10 years beyond that, he said.The statute allows us to send it to collections. A collection agency can garnish their wages, he added.Making restitution is one part of a sentence a convicted youthful offender could expect, he noted.Other requirements could include mandatory school attendance, restitution payments if the youth is employed, as much as 30 days in jail, community supervision (by a probation officer), and community service, Hubbard said. "

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Aug 29 edition online now. Browse the archives.