Seabeck Elementary students spent a day respecting men and women they never have met but to whom they are eternally grateful. Veterans from the community came to the school Wednesday, Nov. 8, to share and remind the students of the cost of freedom in America.I think it's real important to celebrate our freedom, said Seabeck librarian Carrie Riplinger, who helped organize the day's programs.Veterans who spoke included school board member John Farbarik and former World War II fighter pilot Bob Rice. There was also a display of military vehicles prepared by Vern Christopher. The day ended with an assembly and presentation from World War II and Korean War veteran Elmer Arter. After students presented poems about Veterans Day and performed songs honoring American history, Arter gave a presentation about his own experience as veteran. It's hard to know what to talk about, Arter said. There is so much to say.Arter was drafted into the Army in 1942 and was assigned to be a pigeoneer in the Army Signal Corp. Arter told the audience of how pigeons were used in World War II for communications and their importance in communication history. He also sang along with the songs performed by Seabeck's band and choir.Some of those songs I haven't heard in a long time, Arter said.Arter said that if America were to go to war again, he hopes those fighting will be as well-prepared as he was. He said he has heard the military is not as ready as it was when he went to war and that future conflicts will have to be fought the same zeal as the previous wars America has won. When I went to war, I went to basic training twice, Arter said.The presentation ended with a reading of the names of USS Cole crewmembers who were killed in the bombing in Yemen. The audience remained silent while Klahowya student Jesse Ellis, a former Seabeck student, played Taps.I think we need to know of the sacrifices made for freedom, Riplinger said. The veterans need to be remembered for the love of country, their courage and their dedication through tremendous odds. " "/> Seabeck Elementary students spent a day respecting men and women they never have met but to whom they are eternally grateful. Veterans from the community came to the school Wednesday, Nov. 8, to share and remind the students of the cost of freedom in America.I think it's real important to celebrate our freedom, said Seabeck librarian Carrie Riplinger, who helped organize the day's programs.Veterans who spoke included school board member John Farbarik and former World War II fighter pilot Bob Rice. There was also a display of military vehicles prepared by Vern Christopher. The day ended with an assembly and presentation from World War II and Korean War veteran Elmer Arter. After students presented poems about Veterans Day and performed songs honoring American history, Arter gave a presentation about his own experience as veteran. It's hard to know what to talk about, Arter said. There is so much to say.Arter was drafted into the Army in 1942 and was assigned to be a pigeoneer in the Army Signal Corp. Arter told the audience of how pigeons were used in World War II for communications and their importance in communication history. He also sang along with the songs performed by Seabeck's band and choir.Some of those songs I haven't heard in a long time, Arter said.Arter said that if America were to go to war again, he hopes those fighting will be as well-prepared as he was. He said he has heard the military is not as ready as it was when he went to war and that future conflicts will have to be fought the same zeal as the previous wars America has won. When I went to war, I went to basic training twice, Arter said.The presentation ended with a reading of the names of USS Cole crewmembers who were killed in the bombing in Yemen. The audience remained silent while Klahowya student Jesse Ellis, a former Seabeck student, played Taps.I think we need to know of the sacrifices made for freedom, Riplinger said. The veterans need to be remembered for the love of country, their courage and their dedication through tremendous odds. "">Seabeck Elementary students spent a day respecting men and women they never have met but to whom they are eternally grateful. Veterans from the community came to the school Wednesday, Nov. 8, to share and remind the students of the cost of freedom in America.I think it's real important to celebrate our freedom, said Seabeck librarian Carrie Riplinger, who helped organize the day's programs.Veterans who spoke included school board member John Farbarik and former World War II fighter pilot Bob Rice. There was also a display of military vehicles prepared by Vern Christopher. The day ended with an assembly and presentation from World War II and Korean War veteran Elmer Arter. After students presented poems about Veterans Day and performed songs honoring American history, Arter gave a presentation about his own experience as veteran. It's hard to know what to talk about, Arter said. There is so much to say.Arter was drafted into the Army in 1942 and was assigned to be a pigeoneer in the Army Signal Corp. Arter told the audience of how pigeons were used in World War II for communications and their importance in communication history. He also sang along with the songs performed by Seabeck's band and choir.Some of those songs I haven't heard in a long time, Arter said.Arter said that if America were to go to war again, he hopes those fighting will be as well-prepared as he was. He said he has heard the military is not as ready as it was when he went to war and that future conflicts will have to be fought the same zeal as the previous wars America has won. When I went to war, I went to basic training twice, Arter said.The presentation ended with a reading of the names of USS Cole crewmembers who were killed in the bombing in Yemen. The audience remained silent while Klahowya student Jesse Ellis, a former Seabeck student, played Taps.I think we need to know of the sacrifices made for freedom, Riplinger said. The veterans need to be remembered for the love of country, their courage and their dedication through tremendous odds. " "/> Soldiers and sailors tell Seabeck students how it was - Central Kitsap Reporter
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Soldiers and sailors tell Seabeck students how it was

">Seabeck Elementary students spent a day respecting men and women they never have met but to whom they are eternally grateful. Veterans from the community came to the school Wednesday, Nov. 8, to share and remind the students of the cost of freedom in America.I think it's real important to celebrate our freedom, said Seabeck librarian Carrie Riplinger, who helped organize the day's programs.Veterans who spoke included school board member John Farbarik and former World War II fighter pilot Bob Rice. There was also a display of military vehicles prepared by Vern Christopher. The day ended with an assembly and presentation from World War II and Korean War veteran Elmer Arter. After students presented poems about Veterans Day and performed songs honoring American history, Arter gave a presentation about his own experience as veteran. It's hard to know what to talk about, Arter said. There is so much to say.Arter was drafted into the Army in 1942 and was assigned to be a pigeoneer in the Army Signal Corp. Arter told the audience of how pigeons were used in World War II for communications and their importance in communication history. He also sang along with the songs performed by Seabeck's band and choir.Some of those songs I haven't heard in a long time, Arter said.Arter said that if America were to go to war again, he hopes those fighting will be as well-prepared as he was. He said he has heard the military is not as ready as it was when he went to war and that future conflicts will have to be fought the same zeal as the previous wars America has won. When I went to war, I went to basic training twice, Arter said.The presentation ended with a reading of the names of USS Cole crewmembers who were killed in the bombing in Yemen. The audience remained silent while Klahowya student Jesse Ellis, a former Seabeck student, played Taps.I think we need to know of the sacrifices made for freedom, Riplinger said. The veterans need to be remembered for the love of country, their courage and their dedication through tremendous odds. "

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