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Vaughn turns in his whistle

Former Olympic High teacher Ted Vaughn, right, recently met with U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee while on a trip to Washington, D.C. - Courtesy photo
Former Olympic High teacher Ted Vaughn, right, recently met with U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee while on a trip to Washington, D.C.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

Ted Vaughn, a physical education teacher at Olympic High School, is calling it quits after 30 years. Vaughn announced his retirement in the beginning of June and was trying to keep it a low-profile affair.

Vaughn was recently named the national physical education teacher of the year by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. He was chosen in April from a panel of six regional teachers of the year.

In his role of teacher of the year, he will be traveling the United States and giving lectures on his doctrine: That children need to eat right, exercise and have healthy life habits.

It is because of his frequent travels that Vaughn opted to retire. He sees the teacher of the year title as an opportunity to take his message to a wider audience.

But the flip side of that, though, is his travels will take him out of the classroom.

“I feel like students are getting the short end of the stick because I was going to be gone so much,” Vaughn said.

Although Vaughn taught at Olympic High, his reach was district-wide.

As for his impact at Olympic High, he is more proud of his work on the Healthy Schools Initiative. Vaughn has been the district leader of the Healthy School Team for the last five years. The team has 11 staff members and a student

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