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In case of disaster, CKJH turns to Ready Relief

Central Kitsap Junior High School students put on hair nets and plastic gloves before they attempted their task of filling emergency supply bags. - Photo by Jesse Beals
Central Kitsap Junior High School students put on hair nets and plastic gloves before they attempted their task of filling emergency supply bags.
— image credit: Photo by Jesse Beals

The world has weathered a series of natural disasters lately which have motivated the students at Central Kitsap Junior High School to fund-raise for others in need. The Asian tsunami, the Katrina Hurricane on the Gulf Coast, and most recently the earthquake in Pakistan have had students planning for emergencies at home as well.

“We just want to be ready in case of something like that because the other disasters , they weren’t really prepared,” said Kimberly Sison, a ninth grade student and Associated Student Body officer.

Kim Carroll, physical education teacher and emergency preparedness coordinator at CKJH, got in contact with Silverdale-based Ready Relief two years ago.

The organization supplies local schools with affordable emergency meals. When she first learned about it, Carroll did not have the funds to bring Ready Relief to the school. However, the recent streak of disasters forced her into action.

“We have never had food here,” she said. “Especially since Katrina and the tsunami last year, it was very important for me to supply that.

“Seeing that there’s such a need and even the best laid plans run amuck, it’s best for us to have something here just in case.”

So, in the spirit of preparedness, ASB officers, leadership class students, wrestling team and Family, Career, Community Leaders of America members gathered after school on Thursday at the cafeteria. The students donned hair nets, gloves and aprons and chanted “Lentil, spice, chicken, rice.”

Filling plastic bags with the four ingredients in that order, students then weighed each package and vacuum-sealed it.

“It’s enough rations for three days for 1,000 people,” said Michael Crowley, ninth-grader, ASB and FCCLA member.

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