Opinion

A scary reality

Tonight, many seniors at Central Kitsap High School will dance the night away at their prom, making memories that will last a lifetime.

They will share one of their last major school shindigs with their peers, before venturing out into the real world. All it takes is one bad decision to turn a night of fun and celebration into tragedy.

Despite still being in high school, the reality of drunk driving is always prevalent, no matter a person’s age. Everyday, lives are turned inside out because of one bad decision to get behind the wheel after drinking.

One night of fun can turn into a lifetime of hell just because someone decided to get loaded before taking to the streets. The statistics are staggering and a scary reality. One out of every 200 babies born today will die in an alcohol-related crash, according to the national office of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). One person is lost to a drunk driving fatality every 23 minutes and 345,000 people are injured each year. Lives are ruined and hearts are broken and yet it’s something that can easily be prevented. At Tuesday’s mock crash at CK High School, sponsored by MADD, students were shown the horrifying consequences of drinking and driving. A mother’s tearful story was read aloud to those who may have known Heather Meadows. A 2003 CK High grad, her life was cut short by a repeat offender who was so drunk he drove the wrong way on the freeway, crashing into her car head-on in the early morning hours of March 13, 2005, in South King County. Heather wasn’t even the one drinking, yet it cost her her life. The following poem, recorded and played to CK High’s seniors, is a heart-wrenching reminder of the lives ruined by drunk driving.

I Went to a Party, Mom

Author Unknown

I went to a party mom, I remembered what you said

You told me not to drink, So I drank soda instead.

I felt real proud inside mom, The way you said I would

I didn’t drink, Even though my friends said I should.

I know I did the right thing mom, I know you’re always right

Now the party is finally ending, As everyone drove out of sight.

As I got inside my car mom, I knew I’d get home in one piece

Because of the way you made me, So responsible and sweet.

I started to drive away mom, As I pulled onto the road

The other car didn’t see me, It hit me like a load.

As I lay here on the pavement mom, I hear the policeman say

The other man was drunk, And now I have to pay.

I’m lying here dying mom, I wish you’d get here soon

How come this happened to me, My life burst like a balloon.

There is blood all around me mom, Most of it is mine

I hear the paramedic say, I’ll die in a very short time.

I just wanted to tell you mom, I swear I didn’t drink

It was the others, The others didn’t think.

He didn’t know where he was going mom, He was probably at

the same party as I

The only difference is, He drank and I will die.

Why do people drink mom, It can ruin your whole life

I’m feeling sharp pains now, Pains just like a knife.

Tell my brother not to cry mom, Tell daddy to be brave

When I’m up in heaven, Write daddy’s baby on my grave.

Someone should have told him mom, Not to drink and drive

If only they had taken the time, I would still be alive.

My breath is getting shorter mom, I’m becoming very scared

Please don’t cry for me, Because when I needed you, you were

always there.

I have one last question mom, Before I say goodbye

I didn’t drink, So why am I to die?

This is the end mom

I wish I could look you in the eye

To say these final words

I LOVE YOU AND GOODBYE.

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