Sports

Clint's last ride?

Clint Corey had a great ride aboard Growney Brothers Harley Tucker Thursday night at the 43rd annual Kitsap Stampede. The big bronco did just what Corey said he’d do with a couple leaps and a break to the right for a score of 79 that was the night’s best and second overall in the standings. - Photo by Jesse Beals
Clint Corey had a great ride aboard Growney Brothers Harley Tucker Thursday night at the 43rd annual Kitsap Stampede. The big bronco did just what Corey said he’d do with a couple leaps and a break to the right for a score of 79 that was the night’s best and second overall in the standings.
— image credit: Photo by Jesse Beals

Announcer Randy Corley never said it, but rodeo fans at Thursday’s Kitsap Stampede might have caught their last glimpse of Clint Corey competitively riding at Thunderbird Stadium.

The Central Kitsap grad has never won the bareback competition in Silverdale in 16 tries and though he had a good ride aboard Growney Brothers Harley Tucker with a 79, trip No. 17 wasn’t putting him on top of the leaderboard where he was in a familiar second place but still the best ride of the night.

“I always like coming here,” Corey said. “It’s good to be able to compete in front of all my family and friends.”

While he’s hesitant to say this is a farewell tour, waiting to see how the rest of the year transpires before he makes a decision.

Currently ranked No. 17 in the standings, the former World Champion has been consistent this season as he tries to make it back to the National Finals.

If he does, he said he’ll retire at the age of 41 from a full-time rodeo schedule to concentrate more on his ranch in Powell Butte, Ore. where he lives with his wife Dianna and three kids.

“I don’t have anything more to prove,” said Corey, who missed the NFR last year for the first time in 16 years. He’s had some big paydays this year, winning $8,000 in Cheyenne, Wyo. and $5,000 in Salinas, Calif. while finishing in the money in nearly every event for a nearly $40,000 total.

If he doesn’t make the NFR, he said he’ll continue to cut back on his rodeo schedule.

“It’s hard to walk away. Where else am I going to make that kind of money?”

Probably through training, raising and selling horses which is a big adrenaline rush comparable to climbing on a bareback bronco.

“You climb in the middle of a ring on a colt for the first time, you get that adrenaline going,” he said. “I like that part of it.”

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